Historians and Academic Blogging

On Friday afternoon, I will be leading a session at the Reaching a Popular Audience Writing Workshop at UBC about blogging and online self-publishing. Historians and academics have been blogging for many years now, but it is still a generally uncommon practice in academia. However, online publishing through academic blogging can be an incredibly useful medium for disseminating ideas, research findings, and opinions that are not necessarily suited to monograph or journal publication (the dominant forms of academic publishing for historians). It can also serve a very important public history function, providing historians with a means to communicate to readers outside of academia.

Having run this blog for several months now, I can attest to the utility of this medium, but I am no expert. If you have any comments or suggestions that you would like to add to this topic of historians and academic blogging, please post them as comments here and I’ll pass them along during the session on Friday.

Here are some of the additional resources we’ll be consulting as part of this session at the writing workshop:

CNET Real Deal Podcast Episode 198: Beginner’s Guide to Blogging
http://www.cnet.com/8301-17920_1-10456185-84.html

Academic blogs: Connecting People and Ideas
From the Career Corner at Congress 2009 in Ottawa

http://www.universityaffairs.ca/academic-blogs-connecting-people-and-ideas.aspx

Cliopatria’s History Blog Roll

http://hnn.us/blogs/entries/9665.html

Dan Cohen, “Professors, Start Your Blogs” Digital Humanities Blog 21 August 2006

http://www.dancohen.org/blog/posts/professors_start_your_blogs

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4 Responses

  1. I’m a graduate student in US history. My blog (linked above) has been useful to me: 1) as a way to share my research with scholars and non-scholars in an informal context; 2) as a way to give hiring committees and far-flung colleagues a sense of who I am and what I do; 3) as a way to share what I see at academic conferences— particularly important in this age of shrinking travel budgets.

    I also use WordPress (my blog software) to run other parts of my website— including pages where I post conference talks and other scholarly ephemera that wouldn’t normally be accessible to colleagues.

  2. Thanks for posting your comments, Shane. We’ll certainly be taking a look at your blog on Friday.

  3. Thanks for the idea, the support, and the enthusiasm, Sean! I’m up and running. For look me at Merle Massie A Place in History on wordpress!

  4. I’ve added you to my list of important links. Your layout looks terrific and I love the name. Welcome to academic blogging!

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