Canadian Environmental History on the Radio

You can now listen to Nature’s Past, the Canadian environmental history podcast, on the radio (in Prince George)! The kind folks at CFUR 88.7, the campus radio station at the University of Northern British Columbia will be broadcasting the full series of Nature’s Past this summer. This will be the first time that the podcast will make the jump to radio.

I’m obviously very pleased to have the podcast aired on CFUR and I’d love to get it out to more campus radio stations. If you are looking for content to air on your campus radio station, please get in touch with me and let me know. You can contact me through the Nature’s Past Twitter account @naturespast or via email.

If you happen to be in Prince George over the summer, tune in to 88.7 on your FM dial at noon on Wednesdays to catch Nature’s Past. Thanks CFUR!

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Nature’s Past Canadian Environmental History Podcast Episode 15 Available

NiCHE_Podcast_Logo1smallEpisode 15 Forestry Education in Canada: May 26, 2010
[43:04]

In 1907, the University of Toronto opened Canada’s first forestry school to undergraduate students. This was the beginning of formal forestry education in Canada and great step forward for the profession. However, the history of the Faculty of Forestry reveals a troubled past filled with struggles to balance the interests of the provincial government, private industry, and the university administration. Mark Kuhlberg joins us for an extended interview about his new book One Hundred Rings and Counting: Forestry Education and Forestry in Toronto and Canada, 1907-2007 in which he chronicles the first century of this foundational institution and fills a significant gap in the literature on the history of the development of professional forestry.

Also, Lauren Wheeler, from the New Scholars in Canadian History and Environment Group discusses an upcoming virtual environmental history workshop for graduate students called Place and Placelessness.

Please be sure to take a moment and review this podcast on our iTunes page.

Visit the main page at http://niche-canada.org/naturespast

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Works Cited

Music Credits

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Nature’s Past Canadian Environmental History Podcast Episode 14 Available

NiCHE_Podcast_Logo1smallEpisode 14 Management of the Newfoundland Cod Collapse: April 20, 2010.
[42:40]

North American environmental history is punctuated by notorious episodes of species extinctions, most notably the cases of the passenger pigeon and the bison. In both cases, humans exhausted what they believed were unlimited resources in the absence of any scientific management or regulations.

The collapse of the Newfoundland cod fishery in the 1990s stands out from these previous events because of the industry’s dependence on scientific management. This month, we speak with Professor Dean Bavington from Nipissing University about his research and the publication of his new book Managed Annihilation: An Unnatural History of the Newfoundland Cod Collapse.

Also, Marco Armiero, a senior researcher from the Italian National Research Council, tells us more about EMiGR, the Environment and Migration Group of Research.

Please be sure to take a moment and review this podcast on our iTunes page.

Visit the main page at http://niche-canada.org/naturespast

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Works Cited

Sean Kheraj, Canadian History & Environment

https://seankheraj.wordpress.com

Bavington, Dean L.Y. Managed Annihilation: An Unnatural History of the Newfoundland Cod Collapse. Vancouver: UBC Press, 2010.

Crosby, Alfred. The Columbian Exchange: Biological and Cultural Consequences of 1492. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood, 1973.

Crosby, Alfred W. Ecological Imperialism: The Biological Expansion of Europe, 900-1900. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1986.

Environment and Migration Group of Research (EMiGR)

http://migration-environment.webnode.com/

Music Credits

“Test Drive” by Zapac

“Kids” by Pitx

“Baby Me” by Glenn Miller

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Nature’s Past Canadian Environmental History Podcast Episode 13 Available

NiCHE_Podcast_Logo1smallEpisode 13 New Directions in Urban Environmental History & Abandoned Mines: March 3, 2010.
[49:59]

Next week the American Society for Environmental History will hold its annual meeting in Portland, Oregon. Environmental historians will gather from March 10-13 to share new research and ideas, roughly surrounding the theme of “Currents of Change”.

On this episode of the podcast, we feature a preview discussion about a round-table panel for next week’s ASEH meeting called “Urbs in Horto: New Directions in Urban Environmental History”. Matthew Klingle, Ellen Stroud, Karl Appuhn, and Sean Kheraj sit down to discuss new developments in the field of urban environmental history and invite listeners to post comments or questions. Please let us know what you think.

Also, John Sandlos and Arn Keeling stop by to talk about their new project on abandoned mines in the Canadian North. This project examines the social and environmental consequences of large-scale mining operations for local Aboriginal people in northern Canada.

Please be sure to take a moment and review this podcast on our iTunes page.

Visit the main page at http://niche-canada.org/naturespast

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Works Cited

Sean Kheraj, Canadian History & Environment

https://seankheraj.wordpress.com

2010 American Society for Environmental History Annual Meeting Program

Cronon, William. Nature’s Metropolis: Chicago and the Great West. New York: W.W. Norton, 1991.

Careless, J.M.S. “Frontierism, Metropolitanism, and Canadian History.” Canadian Historical Review 35, no. 1 (1954): 1-21.

Stroud, Ellen. “Does Nature Always Matter? Following Dirt through History.” History and Theory 42, no. 4 (2004): 75-81.

Appuhn, Karl. A Forest on the Sea: Environmental Expertise in Renaissance Venice Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009.

Klingle, Matthew. Emerald City: An Environmental History of Seattle New Haven: Yale University Press, 2007.

Abandoned Mines in Northern Canada Project

Music Credits

“Sin Duda” by gmz

“The Way” by Pitx

“Spanish Samba” by Oursvince

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Nature’s Past Canadian Environmental History Podcast Episode 12 Available

NiCHE_Podcast_Logo1smallEpisode 12 Industrialization in Subarctic Environments: January 19, 2010.
[24:30]

Between 1920 and 1960, Canada’s northwest subarctic region experienced late-stage rapid industrialization along its large lakes. These included Lake Winnipeg, Lake Athabasca, Great Slave Lake, and Great Bear Lake. Powered by high-energy fossil fuels, the natural resources of the northwest were integrated into international commodity markets and distributed throughout the world. Whitefish from the large lakes found their way onto dinner plates in New York while uranium from Canada’s northwest fueled the world’s most destructive weapons, atomic bombs.

Professor Liza Piper joins us this month to discuss her new book The Industrial Transformation of Subarctic Canada from UBC Press. This book explores a region unfamiliar to most Canadians and how that space was transformed through industrial processes in the twentieth century. Rather than finding industrial technologies dominating the landscape of the northwest, Professor Piper found that humans used those technologies to assimilate nature.

Please be sure to take a moment and review this podcast on our iTunes page.

Visit the main page at http://niche-canada.org/naturespast

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Works Cited

Sean Kheraj, Canadian History & Environment

https://seankheraj.wordpress.com

Piper, Liza. The Industrial Transformation of Subarctic Canada. Vancouver: UBC Press, 2009.

Music Credits

“R&R&R” by Pitx

“Hapbirmai” by Pitx

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Nature’s Past Canadian Environmental History Podcast Episode 11 Available

NiCHE_Podcast_Logo1smallEpisode 11 Animals, History, and Environment: November 22, 2009.
[55:05]

Environmental history is primarily concerned with the relationship between humans and non-human nature, but the study of non-human nature holds a different set of problems and poses a different set of questions when considering non-human animals. As environmental historians continue to explore the place of animals in stories of the past, they increasingly cross into the rich literature and theory of historical animals studies.

This episode of the podcast looks at the place of animals in environmental history. We begin by speaking with Erica Fudge, the author of several books in historical animal studies, about her 2006 essay “The History of Animals” on the H-Animal Discussion Network. Then Sharon Kirsch joins us to discuss her new book What Species of Creatures: Animals Relations from the New World.

Please be sure to take a moment and review this podcast on our iTunes page.

Visit the main page at http://niche-canada.org/naturespast

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Works Cited

Sean Kheraj, Canadian History & Environment

https://seankheraj.wordpress.com

Loo, Tina. States of Nature: Conserving Canada’s Wildlife in the Twentieth Century. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 2006.

Sandlos, John. Hunters at the Margin: Native People and Wildlife Conservation in the Northwest Territories. Vancouver: UBC Press, 2007.

Colpitts, George. Game in the Garden: A Human History of Wildlife in Western Canada to 1940. Vancouver: UBC Press, 2002.

Ritvo, Harriet. “Animal Planet.” Environmental History 9, no. 2 (2004): 204-220.

Fudge, Erica. “The History of Animals.” Ruminations, H-Animal discussion network, no. 1 (2006).

Kirsch, Sharon. What Species of Creatures: Animal Relations from the New World. Vancouver: New Star Books, 2008.

Music Credits

“Septiembre” by BlondBlood – FG3 Free Guitars Project

“Mirando al Horizonte” Jaime Heras – FG3 Free Guitars Project

“Rumba Sudamericana” by Paco Santiago – FG3 Free Guitars Project

“Epiclatinarabrock” by Daniel Bautista – FG3 Free Guitars Project

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Nature’s Past Canadian Environmental History Podcast Episode 10 Available

NiCHE_Podcast_Logo1smallEpisode 10 Digital Technologies and Environmental History: October 21, 2009.
[40:59]

How have online digital technologies changed environmental history research, communication, and teaching? This episode of the podcast explores this question in the context of the recent NiCHE Digital Infrastructure API Workshop held in Mississauga, Ontario. Online-based Application Programming Interfaces or APIs are just one digital technology that holds the potential to change the way environmental historians access resources, analyze historical data, and communicate research findings. Within the past decade alone, the development of online digital technologies has offered the potential to transform historical scholarship.

This episode includes a round-table conversation with some leading figures in the realm of digital history as well as an interview with Jan Oosthoek, the producer and host of the Exploring Environmental History podcast.

Please be sure to take a moment and review this podcast on our iTunes page.

Visit the main page at http://niche-canada.org/naturespast

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Works Cited

Sean Kheraj, Canadian History & Environment

https://seankheraj.wordpress.com

Dan Cohen’s Website

http://www.dancohen.org/

Digital Campus Podcast

http://digitalcampus.tv/

Heptanesian Archives

http://heptanesia.net/

NYPL Map Rectifier

http://maps.nypl.org

Great Unsolved Mysteries in Canadian History

http://canadianmysteries.ca

Environmental History Resources

http://www.eh-resources.org/

Environmental History Teaching

http://www.eh-teaching.org/

MSc. Landscape, Environment & History

http://teaching.shc.ed.ac.uk/esh/msc_landscape/examples/

Music Credits

“I Bid Ye Farewell” by AndyExpandy

“Crayonz” by AndyExpandy

“Expandimonium!” by AndyExpandy

“Pancakes” by AndyExpandy

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